Attendance

You must make sure that your child gets a full-time education that meets their needs. Children must get an education between the school term after their 5th birthday and the last Friday in June in the school year they turn 16.

You’ll be contacted by either:

  • the school - if your child is enrolled in school and does not turn up (even if they’re only absent for a day)
  • the council’s education welfare officer - if they think your child is not getting a suitable education at home

You can be prosecuted if you do not give your child an education. You’ll normally get warnings and offers of help from the local council first. You can get education and attendance information from your council.

 

When your child can miss school

You can only allow your child to miss school if either:

  • they’re too ill attend
  • you’ve got advance permission from the school

There’s extra support available if your child cannot go to school for long periods because of a health problem.

If your child is too ill to come to school, please leave a message on the school attendance line, each day that your child is absent, by calling 0208 743 5648 and choosing option 1. If we have not received a message that your child is absent, a member of staff will telephone you to find out where your child is.  This is for your child’s safety and to ensure that we know they are safe, so please be understanding if you receive a call from us.

The school Attendance Officer is Mrs. Cristina Inacio, please contact her on the number above to discuss any attendance issues. 

You can be fined for taking your child on holiday during term time without the school’s permission.

Regular attendance at school promotes children’s well-being, maximises progress in learning and helps children reach their potential. Good attendance is fundamental to a successful and fulfilling school experience. It is our duty to promote 100% attendance for all children. For our children to take full advantage of the educational opportunities offered it is vital that our children are at school, on time, every day that the school is open unless the reason for the absence is unavoidable.

All children have the right to an education and we have put in place appropriate procedures to support this. We believe that the most important factor in promoting good attendance is development of positive attitudes towards school and learning.

Good attendance is important because:

  • statistics show a direct link between under-achievement and absence below 95%
  • regular attenders make better progress, both socially and academically
  • regular attenders find school routines, school work and friendships easier to cope with
  • regular attenders find learning more satisfying
  • regular attenders are most successful in transferring between primary school, secondary school, higher education and employment or training

If your child is absent for a valid reason, we require proof such as an appointment card, letter or email from the medical professional they are visiting. If your child is persistently absent and we do not have proof of appointments you may be asked to sign a parent contract stating that your child’s attendance will improve.

  

Absence during term time

Background

Head teachers may not grant any leave of absence during term time unless ‘exceptional circumstances’ prevail. The regulations also state that head teachers should determine the number of school days a pupil can be away from school in the event that leave is granted for ‘exceptional circumstances’. To apply for exceptional leave, an exceptional leave form should be collected from the school office, completed and handed back in advance. The headteacher will then decide whether it will be authorised.

This information seeks to help clarify the meaning of ‘exceptional circumstances’ and outline some guiding principles to aid the head teacher’s decision-making process while offering parents a consistent and fair approach to requests for any term-time absence.

The fundamental principles for defining ‘exceptional circumstances’ are that they are ‘rare, significant, unavoidable and short’.

 

Guiding principles

  1. Term times are for education.  This is the priority.  Children and families have 175 days off school to spend time together, including weekends and school holidays. The head teacher will rightly prioritise attendance.  The default school policy is that absences will not be granted during term time and will only be authorised in exceptional circumstances.
  2. The decision to authorise a pupil’s absence is wholly at the head teacher’s discretion based on their assessment and merits of each request.
  3. If an event can be reasonably scheduled outside of term time then it would not be normal to authorise absence for such an event, for example: 
    1. holidays or other travel, including as a result of parental work commitments, are therefore not considered ‘exceptional circumstances’;
    2. leave which is taken because of the availability of cheaper fares or other costs are not regarded as exceptional circumstances;
    3. claims of illness as a reason for a delayed return, particularly after normal school holidays will not be considered unless accompanied by travel tickets dated before the school opens or other agreed dates.  Medical documentation from abroad will not normally be accepted unless accompanied by travel documents indicating travel dates prior to school reopening.
  4. Absences to visit seriously-ill relatives or for a bereavement of a close family member are usually considered to amount to ‘exceptional circumstances’, but for the funeral service and travelling time only, not for extended leave. Absence will only be authorised if the head teacher is satisfied that the circumstances are truly exceptional.
  5. Absences to attend a wedding may be exceptional if the head teacher is satisfied that there is a persuasive reason for holding the wedding during term time and there will be an onus on parents to show clear evidence that this absence is absolutely an exceptional circumstance. In difficult family situations the head teacher may use his discretion in granting leave and each case should be addressed on its individual merits, taking into account the overall welfare of the child.
  6. Absences for important religious observances are often taken into account, but only for the ceremony and travelling time, again, not for extended leave. This is intended for one-off situations rather than regular or recurring events.
  7. The needs of the families of service personnel will be taken into account if they are returning from long operational tours that prevent contact during scheduled holiday time.
  8. Reasonable adjustments for pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities will be made and may result in a leave being grated as an exceptional circumstance.
  9. Families may need time together to recover from a trauma or crisis, including where an absence from school is recommended by a health professional as part of a parent or child’s rehabilitation from a medical or emotional issue.
  10. When making absence-related decisions, the head teacher will consider:
    1. a pupil’s record of attendance for the current and previous academic years;
    2. time of absence being taken in the school year.  If the request is made to extend the beginning or end of a school holiday period, it is unlikely to be considered exceptional.
  11. The head teacher can determine the length of the authorised absence as well as whether a particular absence is authorised.

 

The following factors may also help the head teacher to reach a decision:

  • number of school days being missed;
  • any exceptional term-time leave requested and/or taken in previous academic years for a similar purpose;
  • whether alternative care arrangements have been considered by the parent to limit the time away from school;
  • impact on any interventions, assessments or referrals being undertaken with the child or family, for example, family support, social care assessments, CAMHS, SEN;
  • the potential impact that the absence will have on the child;
  • whether the absence falls within any key stage national tests.

 

Procedures

  • A parent should complete an application form for term-time leave at least two weeks before the start of the leave where possible.  The parent with whom the pupil normally resides must make the application.   
  • Leave may only be granted where proper procedures have been followed and the permission given.  
  • Tickets and/or other travel arrangements should not be booked prior to discussion with and agreement of the school.
  • Parents should not confuse telling the school with having permission.
  • Where the school and the parents fail to reach an agreement and the child is then absent from school the absence will be marked as unauthorised. Unauthorised absences are an offence and can be liable to legal action or a fixed penalty fine.  
  • Extended absences may put your child’s school place at risk.
  • In the event of an emergency when you have to take leave urgently, taking children, then you should inform the school or have the school informed immediately.  Leave of absence cannot be granted retrospectively and evidence may be asked for.
  • Parents are warned that if they take their child out of school without permission the Local Authority has the power to issue Fixed-Penalty Notices in respect of unauthorised absences.
  • Penalty notices can be issued to each parent and for each child.  The Penalty is £120 payable within 28 days but reducing to £60 if paid within 21 days.  (Anti-Social Behaviour Act 2004).

Please note that if a child does not attend school for a period of 20 consecutive days, they may be removed from the school roll and are at risk of losing their school place.